Dr. David Samadi Discusses How Certain Vitamin Supplements Can Increase Cancer Risk

Iron is an essential nutrient for every cell in the body, but researchers are saying when too much iron accumulates in the body it becomes a risk factor for cancer. Expert urologist, Dr. David Samadi discussed the risk factors of vitamins and supplements, on a Fox News segment.

There is a vast amount of medical research and studies that demonstrate a link between high levels of iron and a wide variety of cancers. Despite this, the problem of iron overload has been virtually ignored by the medical world since the discovery of its existence. Dr. Samadi says, patients must inform their doctors about vitamin supplements, and points out that when taking supplements, proper dosages are important.

According to Dr. Eugene Weinberg, a well-known immunologist at Indiana University, both normal and cancer cells have the same need for iron for their growth. Dr. Weinberg says malignant cells are more skilled than normal cells in acquiring iron. Increased iron entry benefits cancer cells in their ongoing process of multiplication and proliferation.

The body attempts to limit the access of iron into cancerous cells by moving iron from the blood to the depository tissues. As a result, blood iron levels tend to decrease, often giving the false impression of the existence of a state of iron deficiency, and sometimes inducing patients, or even physicians to believe more iron is needed.

Iron levels tend to increase in many of us as we age, because once iron is absorbed it has virtually no chance of being eliminated. We eliminate only one milligram of iron per day. The rest is eventually absorbed and accumulate in the tissues.

Iron overload promotes the production of free radicals, fat oxidation, and DNA damage. Scientific studies tell us that an excess of iron in the body increases our susceptibility to a range of diseases, not only to cancer, but heart disease, and other inflammatory conditions.

Accordin to Dr. David Samadi, Chairman at Lenox Hill Hospital, advise your doctor about all the supplements you take, and the dosages. Dr. Samadi’s primary expertise is in urologic diseases. After receiving his medical degree from Stony Brook University, and completing his residency and oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Dr. Samadi studied robotic surgery at The University hospital of Henri-Mondor More, in France.

With more than 30 awards, over the years, Dr. Samadi is also a medical correspondent with Fox News, and has an AM radio show. He is also the host of Sunday Housecall, offering medical developments, news and opinions.

For details: www.crunchbase.com/person/dr-david-samadi

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